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Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Guide

This guide is meant to support students in the CRES minor.

What is a Libguide?

A "libguide" is short for library guide, it is intended to act as a guide to help students conduct research, in this case, to help students in the CRES minor but also students of The Roger Salter's Doctoral Writing Institute (RSI) find resources related to Critical Race Theory in different disciplines. Throughout this guide, you will see links to articles, freely available or open access journals, as well as journals that the University of Denver Libraries pays a subscription for, and of course, books. Links to other content such as videos or podcasts are also spread throughout the guide.

This guide was started in collaboration with current and previous RSI participants, IRISE post-docs, and others. While it is still a work in progress, and revisited often, I want to acknowledge their labor and express my gratitude for their time and energy. Thank you.

If you have any suggestions, recommendations, or feedback, please feel free to e-mail Denisse Solis at Denisse.Solis@du.edu.

If you need more general library help, you can also contact the library via the Ask Us! chatbox on each page, schedule a one-hour research consultation with a librarian to talk in-depth about your topic, specific resources, evaluating sources, and any other questions you have about the research process. Request a consultation by clicking this link

Introduction to Critical Race Theory

What is Critical Race Theory?

In the 1995 article, "Who's Afraid of Critical Race Theory?" Derrick A. Bell states,

Critical Race Theory is a body of legal scholarship, now about a decade old, a majority of whose members are both existentially people of color and ideologically committed to the struggle against racism, particularly as institutionalized in and by law. Those critical race theorists who are white are usually cognizant of and committed to the overthrow of their own racial privilege. 

As the movement grew it spread across the disciplines but generally stays within Bell's description.

Introductory Texts